Scullyfied Simpsons: “Beyond Blunderdome” (Season 11, Episode 1)

 

Homer yelling at Mel Gibson in "Beyond Blunderdome"
Our hero – proclaiming his wife as property because Mel Gibson is at the front door. Were these writers trying to make him unlikable?

 

Movie tickets? That’s hardly worth destroying a car!” – Homer Simpson. To be fair, that is a fine piece of logic, that I’m sure will carry through the season.

Airdate: September 26th, 1999

Written By: Mike Scully

Plot: An electric car manufacturer entices potential buyers to test drive with possible gifts. Homer’s reward for test-driving (read, destroying) the car is two tickets to a test screening of Mel Gibson’s newest movie, Mr. Smith Goes To Washington. While Marge (who is infatuated with Mel) loves the movie like most of the audience, Homer is much more critical. It’s Homer’s critique that gets through to Gibson, however, and the duo embark on a controversial edit of the film to amp up the action.

Review:

Wow! I’m actually impressed! I can tell from this episode alone that Season 11 is going to be haphazard. That takes a special kind of effort, writers, but you showed it! Good for you – enjoy my somewhat neurotic rant on this episode.

Yup, Season 11 starts off on a rather… less than satisfactory note with the aptly-titled “Beyond Blunderdome”. (They tried to make a punny, and they made a funny in ways they didn’t imagine.) So, what do we have here? Jerkass Homer? Homer getting a job? Zany schemes? Jerkass Homer getting a zany job? Well, you guess right if you got the latter, but there is one big issue with this episode that would damage it, even without the Mike Scully cliches.

It’s a love letter.

To Mel Gibson. Continue reading

Scullyfied Simpsons: Season 11 Preview

 

The_Simpsons_-_The_11th_Season
Taken from Wikipedia

 

“Does anybody care what this guy thinks?” “NO!”

Well, here we are… Season 11 of The Simpsons. We are halfway through the Mike Scully era. And from the looks of things, I think we might be in the doldrums here.

I mean, consider that this season premiered just weeks before the 10th anniversary of the first full episode of The Simpsons. The show had spanned through the 90s, had made it through both the Bush Sr. and Clinton eras, saw the rise and “fall” of Grunge, and even was one of the few shows to cross from the pre-Internet and “internet” generations. There were and are people (myself included) who have never known the world without The Simpsons on TV.

But this success can’t last forever. Continue reading